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Blu-ray Reviews for October 17, 2017

Selections from this week’s Blu-ray releases can be found below in this ongoing weekly summary of reviews. Click on any of the following titles to navigate directly to that review. This week’s releases include: Craig Anderson’s holiday slasher Red Christmas, the “Ozploitation,” Jaws-inspired cult classic Dark Age, Shout! Factory’s fun teen flick Three O’Clock High, gritty gang thriller Shot Caller, and the newest terrible season of American Horror Story, RoanokeA list of other titles also available this week can be found at the end.


Distributor: Artsploitation Films

Dee Wallace headlines as Diane, a matriarch presiding over the gathering of her squabbling grown children on Christmas Day. Tensions give way to terror when a deformed stranger appears at the door with vengeance on his mind. Diane must protect her family as limbs are severed and secrets are brought into the light.


Red Christmas, right off the bat, is intent on establishing that it’s not going to be like other holiday-themed slashers that have come before. It’s not the fun, spook show experience that Halloween perfected, and it’s certainly not the no-brained, silly affair like Silent Night, Deadly Night. More closely aligned with Black Christmas in terms of mood and bleakness, but absolutely still inspired by the ‘80s slasher movement based on the graphic and icky murder sequences, Red Christmas cannot be easily categorized. Any horror film that opens within an abortion clinic in the midst of an attack from Christian fundamentalists in which a fetus thought aborted is tossed in a bucket and kicked in a corner, only to reach up a tiny bloody hand to signify that it still lives, isn’t looking to entertain its audience with LOLs.

Despite setting what is essentially slasher film on a holiday and giving it a typically ironic title, Red Christmas is actually based on a pretty original premise, and stocked with characters you wouldn’t necessarily see in a film like this: one of the siblings is pregnant, another is adopted, another is very buttoned-up and married to a priest, and one has down syndrome. And what a fine dysfunctional family they make. But holding it together is America’s favorite genre mother, Dee Wallace, most famous for Momming it in E.T., Cujo, Critters, The Hills Have Eyes, and…Rob Zombie’s Halloween (boo-hiss). Enjoying the rare leading role, Wallace embraces the lunatic concept of Red Christmas to maximum effect, earning the audience’s sympathy not just because of her awful, squabbling family, but because of the past that comes back to haunt her.

Red Christmas can be fun at times, but deeply upsetting at others, and so many taboos are broken that it’s easy to wonder how anyone with a conscious could enjoy the film at all. And while Red Christmas is hard to watch, it oddly satisfies in that way only an ‘80s slasher could, while also going for the jugular a bit more feverishly.

Writer/director Craig Anderson’s Suspiria-inspired lighting scheme dazzles and adds to the uniqueness of Red Christmas, bathing several environments in red and green, giving it both your typical holiday look but also making everything feel off and unsettling.

Red Christmas has flaws, to be sure, but its daringness to break taboos and to be utterly bleak by its end make up for them. It has brains (for once), heart (though it wants to break yours), and it certainly has spirit. It’s one of the most unique horror films of the year, but one that’s also a tough watch. Be sure that you’re ready.

PICTURE & SOUND:

Anderson’s digital and very colorful shoot dazzles in high-def. Though some exterior scenes hew too dark, with some information becoming lost, Red Christmas offers an excellent video presentation. Audio fares well, though is a bit more low key. Dialogue is mostly understandable, although the killer’s warbled and muffled voice might necessitate the subtitles (which, thankfully, this release provides.) The musical score by Helen Grimley isn’t your typically synth-based concoction you’d expect in a throwback slasher flick like this, as it leans more on somber piano melodies.  Every time a character meets his or her end, there’s no heightened burst of frenzied “RUN!” but rather a wave of “this should really make you sad.”

THE SUPPLEMENTS:

The interview with Dee Wallace runs nearly 20 minutes and talks, obviously, about Red Christmas, but also several other titles from her acting past (yes, including Cujo). Her interview self easily shows why she’s America’s movie mom — because she’s as sweet as anyone you’re ever likely to see in the genre.

The complete list of special features is as follows:

  • Feature-length commentary with writer/director Craig Anderson
  • Interview with Dee Wallace
  • Interview with Gerald Odwyer
  • Interview with Craig Anderson
  • Bloopers

OVERALL:

Know before going in that Red Christmas might show a familiar face and a well-worn concept, but it’s not your typical slasher flick. Much more intent on upsetting rather than amusing, Red Christmas is definitely what a horror film should be: unique, uncomfortable, and at times difficult to watch. Its Blu-ray release definitely satisfies and comes highly recommended.


Distributor: Umbrella Entertainment

A classic tale of terror from the golden age of Aussie exploitation, Dark Age features outback stalwart John Jarratt as Northern Territory wildlife ranger Steve Harris, a stoic survivor charged with conserving the ever diminishing crocodile population from encroaching hunters, hell-bent on destruction of the species. Faced with formidable opposition from gung-ho hunter John Besser (Max Phipps), Steve is joined by girlfriend Cathy (Nikki Coghill) and sets out to relocate a giant crocodile to a breeding ground sanctuary, well out of harm’s way. Aided by expert tracker Oondabund (Burnam Burnam) and Adjaral (David Gulpilil) the intrepid foursome risk life and limb in a terrifying journey that will test their nerves and transform the tranquil Territory waters into a raging red torrent of death.

Following the release of Jaws, which is credited with the creation of the summer blockbuster (though that was unintended), a wave of killer animal flicks followed in its wake. To no one’s surprise, most of these were bad, and to no one’s additional surprise, a lot of these imitators were about sharks. (Just ask Universal — they were firing off C&Ds like it was their job, blocking the stateside releases of Italian produced shark flicks Great White and Cruel Jaws. (The latter flick was made by Italian trashmeister Bruno Mattei under one of his many pseudonyms and incorporated a lot of stolen footage from the Jaws series.)

Every once in awhile, an imitator slipped through and managed to actually be worth a damn, even if it was going more for satire than outright horror. (Joe Dante’s Roger Corman production of Piranha and John Sayles’ Alligator are some of these exceptions.) And, as stated, countries all over the world were getting in on the action.

One of these notable flicks is 1987’s Dark Age, produced and filmed in Australia, which told the tale about a monstrous crocodile munching on a handful of people and making the life of wildlife conservationist Steve Harris whose job is it convince the government not to want crocs to die horribly really really difficult. What makes Dark Age especially notable are two specific components: an infusion of Australian culture (more specifically the local Aboriginal tribe, who become significant to the conflict) and its overall message of conservation. Especially when looking at the latter, Dark Age comes off ballsier than even Jaws, in that despite the crocodile killing whomever crosses its path, the intent on behalf of its main characters are not to kill it, but to trap it and release it in its usual place of inhabitation. Oh, there are a cadre of characters who want the croc dead — from bureaucrats to local poachers — but even after the croc chows down on a young aboriginal boy, the exciting and adventurous Free Willy-ish rescue attempt at the end will leave viewers surprised as they realize they’re rooting for the croc.

The stock Jaws characters are in place, with John Jarratt taking on a combination of Matt Hooper and Chief Brody, and Max Phipps embodying a much more bloodthirsty version of Quint. There’s even a local politician who is afraid of what the croc will do for tourism. Whether or not Dark Age would exist were it not for Jaws becomes moot in the face of how well made and (yeah, I’ll say it) unique Dark Age manages to be. (Not to mention that coastal Australians dealing with a murderous croc is a lot more realistic than New Englanders dealing with a great white.) Dark Age may lack the satire of Alligator, the heart of Jaws, and the sly sense of humor of Piranha, but it’s still a worthy endeavour in its own right, bringing a slice of its native culture along with it.

PICTURE & SOUND:

Dark Age makes its Blu-ray (region free) debut from Australian distributor Umbrella Entertainment in a pretty solid high-def presentation. Colors are strong for the era and the picture is very stable. There are some occasional signs of print damage in the form of minor scratches from time to time, but that’s the only area of concern. Grain is present but not overwhelming; the picture offers a very natural looking presentation. Audio ranks about the same, with dialogue (mostly) understandable, though the Australian accents and Aboriginals’ half-English can be somewhat difficult to understand at times.

THE SUPPLEMENTS:

The complete list of special features is as follows:

  • Audio Commentary with Actor John Jarratt and Executive Producer Antony I. Ginnane
  • A Bicentenary with Bite: Revisiting Dark Age: Panel discussion with film historians Lee Gambin, Alexandra Heller-Nicholas, Emma Westwood and Sally Christie
  • Uncut Not Quite Hollywood Interviews with John Jarratt and Antony I. Ginnane
    Living With Crocodiles: 1986 documentary with Grahame Webb, author of ‘Numunwari’, the book which inspired DARK AGE
  • Trailer and original US release Home Video trailers
  • Image Gallery including rare press and promotional material

OVERALL:

Fans of the “animal run amok” subgenre should not hesitate in picking up this excellent release of Dark Age. (Those interested can grab it directly from the distributor.) At this point, the killer animal subgenre can be broken down further just because of how many of those happen to feature a crocodile or alligator as the antagonist. Dark Age ranks as one of the best.


Distributor: Shout! Factory

The new kid, Buddy Revell (Richard Tyson), is rumored to have a violent history and Jerry Mitchell (Casey Siemaszko) has been tasked with getting to the bottom of it for the school paper. Desperate to get out of writing the story, Jerry accidentally angers Buddy and earns himself a date with Buddy’s fists later that day. Can Jerry escape his parking lot date with destiny?

Three O’Clock High is one of those broad, high-concept, and innocent teen films that don’t get made very often. In the supplementing, director Phil Joanou was quick to say that he was very aware of John Hughs’ mark on the high school teen comedy and that he very purposely steered the execution of Three O’Clock High in a different and less grounded direction. Despite that (and he does — I’m not about to call him a liar), Three O’Clock High shares the broadness, innocence, and easily communicated conflicts of Hughs’ films.

A bully wants to beat up another student.

That’s it. That’s the conflict. There is no deeper hidden meaning (unless you’re really reaching). Punchee-to-be Jerry Mitchell doesn’t go on a day of self-discovery as he awaits his fate. He’s the same character at the end of the day (okay, perhaps braver) than he was when he first woke up late that morning. One might think this is a shortcoming of Three O’Clock High, but on the contrary: the simplicity is the film’s greatest strength.

It’s also a wonderful product of its time. I don’t think it’s a spoiler alert to say that in this lovable, lighthearted teen comedy that Jerry punches the bully back at the end and wins the day, and that’s what makes it so unique: the message IS “seriously, use violence to solve your problems.”

Even the PRINCIPAL (John P. Ryan, in a rare role where he’s not killing someone in a Cannon film) urges Jerry to punch the bully.

A SCHOOL OFFICIAL IS URGING VIOLENCE.

Think that teen-oriented message would ever make the final cut today?

Much of the comedy on display is of the timeless sort, with some gags harking back to the earliest days of Chaplin (the library sequence is one of my new favorite things), and Siemaszko plays a very likeable, every-day type of kid who’s just as confused as to why Buddy the bully has singled him out as we are.

Three O’Clock High is light, easy, and breezy fare, and there’s absolutely nothing wrong with that. Not every high school teen flick needs to have kids at detention spilling their guts, tears, and greatest fears. Sometimes they just have to punch the bully and get the car home before Mom and Dad get back from vacation.

PICTURE & SOUND:

Three O’Clock High on Blu-ray isn’t going to in any awards, but for the kind of film it is, it looks just fine. Not impressive by any means, Shout! Presents it in high-def with a pretty strong and stable image, with barely any print damage to mar the overall presentation. Audio presentation fares about the same. Dialogue and soundtrack selections sound fine and without issue.

THE SUPPLEMENTS:

Among the many new supplements produced for this release, director Phil Joanou provides a very energetic interview about how Three O’Clock High came about. (Steven Spielberg offered him the job, as the film was ghost produced by Amblin Entertainment; in response, Joanou used a piece of Jaws score (but not the theme) in the film as background music for a educational short about insects.) The complete list of special features is as follows:

  • Audio commentary with Director Phil Joanou
  • Head Of The Class” – Interview with Director Phil Joanou
  • “Passing The Test” – Interviews with screenwriters Richard Christian Matheson and Tom Szolossi
  • “School Clothes” – Interview with costume designer Jane Ruhm
  • Theatrical Trailer
  • Still Gallery

OVERALL:

Three O’Clock High is just a fun film, and not one that’s well known, likely getting lost in all the adoration of John Hughes’ output. This reissue by Shout! is a great opportunity to get to know the trials and tribulations of student school store manager Jerry Mitchell and the punch that was heard around the world.


Distributor: Lionsgate

Shot Caller follows the harrowing, often heartrending journey of successful businessman Jacob Harlon (Nikolaj Coster-Waldau) who is transformed into Money – a stoic, ruthless prison gangster – after a DUI sends him down the rabbit hole of the American prison system. As he navigates the brutality of his new home, adapting to its violent codes of ethics and rites of passage that will ensure his survival, he slowly loses his previous identity and his relationship to his former life, including his wife and son. The grip of his new family, the prison gang, extends beyond the prison walls. Upon his release, chased by law enforcement and threatened by his incarcerated ”protectors,” Money must orchestrate one last dangerous crime. All is not what it seems. The ruthless process of fulfilling his obligations also becomes his path to sacrifice, retribution, and self-definition.

If one weren’t looking closely at the credits for Shot Caller, one might assume it were a David Ayer flick, as the film is centered on L.A. crime, grimy and grim gangsters, hardcore prison life, and the very angry and morose cops trying to take them down. Though it’s not a David Ayer flick, all the rest still applies — along with his typical sense of trying to do too much and offer so much detail that the overall story eventually becomes lost.

Unfortunately, despite a radically different performance from Game of Thrones’ Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, Shot Caller proves to be an uneven and unpleasant experience, featuring subplots that don’t serve an obvious purpose and characters so inconsequential they could be removed from the film as it stands without anyone noticing.

Shot Caller exists in a dark and unyielding environment that will feel very similar to fans of FX’s long-celebrated Sons of Anarchy, as it hits all the familiar beats: heavily tattooed muscle men, street slang, underground criminal enterprises, corrupt cops and prison officials, and one man doing very wrong things in order to do right by his family.

Shot Caller hinges the audience’s willingness to sympathize with and support Money’s post-prison descent into further criminality on one long-shot of a goal, which never becomes clear until the final frames. Some viewers may still find this reveal satisfying enough to warrant the journey, with others having hoped for a little more. Personally, I reside in that latter camp.

PICTURE & SOUND:

The video presentation for Shot Caller excels, even if the images its projecting are dim, depressing, and at times disturbing. Clarity is exceptional, with colors hewing strongly to the amber and sepia tones that, again, can be found across much of Ayer’s more grounded projects. Audio is equally exceptional, offering a lot of dynamic range. This is the kind of film where gunshots and shivs are supposed to sound jarring and unsettling, and boy, do they.

THE SUPPLEMENTS:

The complete list of special features is as follows:

  • Filmmaker Commentary
  • ”Inside Job” Featurette

OVERALL:

Shot Caller is a decent time waster, but it’s the kind of film that quickly begins to fade from memory once the credits roll. If nothing else, see it for the performance by Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, who easily embodies a different kind of dual role not unlike Jaime Lannister where you both support him but distrust him at the same time. Shot Caller makes for a fine Blu-ray presentation, but might not be one you’d want to revisit with any regularity.


Distributor: 20th Century Fox

Life imitates grisly reality TV in one of television’s edgiest and most acclaimed shows ever! Told in gripping true-crime documentary style, “My Roanoke Nightmare” – this season’s show within the show – chronicles shocking paranormal events. Hoping to begin a peaceful new life in a rustic North Carolina farmhouse, Shelby and Matt Miller (Emmy winner Sarah Paulson and OSCAR Winner Cuba Gooding Jr) flee Los Angeles…only to find murder, mayhem and madness! From a girl ghost to a swine monster to murderous nurse sisters to a sadistic cult leader known as “The Butcher” (OSCAR Winner Kathy Bates), the couple’s home is filled with nonstop terrors.

(Spoilers abound, so readers beware.)

Oh, American Horror Story. How I want to like you. How you, on the surface, were tailor made for me. Airing on the boundary-pushing FX network, home to the excellent and similarly boundary-pushing Sons of Anarchy, Justified, The Shield, and Fargo, and designed to tell one unique and otherwise unrelated story per season, American Horror Story should be everything I want from an anthological horror series.

And how it misses that boat with every season.

As someone who keeps a constant eye on critical notices for films and television, I’m well aware of the drubbings this season of AHS has received, with most fans angered by the very dramatic “gotcha” moment that appears halfway through. And as someone who normally avoids spoilers whenever possible but hasn’t really felt all that invested in AHS up to this point, I delved into this gotcha moment to see what it was everyone hated.

And I admit that I was intrigued, so I dove into this season regardless of my past indifference to the series as well as to the anger this twist provoked. Knowing the twist, I could at least focus on everything leading up to it and seeing how the showrunners devised on how to arrive there.

I was left both surprised and not surprised.

Knowing where this season of Roanoke was headed didn’t stifle my enjoyment of the first episode or two. The sit-down interviews and the “dramatic reenactments” (which resemble the show fans have grown to love) was an interesting approach, and as someone legitimately intrigued by the “real” history of the Roanoke colony, I was intrigued to see the writers’ interpretation of the “why” of the colony’s mysterious disappearance. I was also heartened to see racism being used as one of the many conflicts our on-screen leads deal with not just in the scary country house and setting, but the big city from which they fled in the first place.

What I got was Ryan Murphy’s take on The Blair Witch Project, with all the Ryan Murphy I could(n’t) stand, which was cemented by the meta latter-half of the season, turning the concept into a Big Brother-type reality show that gathered together the “real” series interviewees and the actors who played them and locked them into the Roanoke house to see how awful everyone could be to each other. The result? Pretty awful.

It’s hard to dedicate one season of a horror-based television show to a full-fledged horror experience without paying homage to films and television shows and books that have come before. As someone who skipped several seasons of the show, I can still see the influences of Tod Browning’s Freaks or The X-Files or The Shining in its many seasons, and Blair Witch’s influence on Roanoke can’t be denied — from the witchy history to the stick men hung from the chimney (and everywhere else) with care to the grain amatuer footage discovered in the bowels of a house which detail something terrifying happening in the woods. But where The Blair Witch Project was an exercise in subtlety, AHS doesn’t know how to spell that word, doesn’t know what it means, and probably think it’s Japanese. What results is AHS’s usual brand of stupidity, now with extra self-servings of novel concepts like actors are vapid and unlikeable, and people are generally awful to each other.

As if living on Planet Earth hasn’t already made that quite clear.

PICTURE & SOUND:

At least all the stupidity and overwroughtness looks good in high-def! Roanoke, like the seasons that have come before (and yeah, credit where credit’s due) looks attractive, constantly offering interesting visuals and lots of on-screen dynamism. This season really leans on brown tones, matching the icky and dour interior color of the house where much of the season is spent. Clarity is also very good, offering exceptional details that you probably don’t want. AHS stepped back from its usual sad-pop-goth soundtrack selections for this reason, leaning more on instrumental mood score, which exists finely in the background of the head-scratching and infuriating dialogue.

THE SUPPLEMENTS:

The complete list of special features is as follows:

  • The Paley Center for Media: Q&A with Cast and Creative Team from PaleyFest 2017
  • Collection of American Horror Story: Roanoke Promos

OVERALL:

Boo-hiss. Even hardcore fans of the show were disappointed with this one, and though I’d never call myself a fan, I can share in their dislike, even if it’s for a different reason. The first half of this season of AHS offers a dialed down version of its usual, which marries competent and interesting with additional stupidity (Evan Peters wearing a powdered wig and serving as a ghost guide from the past is now a thing that exists forever), before devolving into a Paranormal Activity-ish second half that will leave your eyes rolling. I can’t recommend it because it’s dumb, but some of you out there will buy it anyway, so who cares what I think?


Also Available This Week:

Distributor: Lionsgate

Everyone knows America is the land of immigrants, but how much do we really know about what drove those migrations in the first place? America: Promised Land uncovers the great forces in history that helped shape the country we live in today. Told primarily through enhanced graphics, this special will follow the migratory journeys of real people in history, revealing surprising and mind-blowing facts along the way. Each chronological hour will focus on a specific theme — Land, War, Opportunity, and Disaster — to tell the story of how the experiences of our ancestors determined how we ended up where we are.

Special Features:

 

  • Trailers for other Lionsgate Releases

 


Distributor: Shout! Factory

Chihiro’s family is moving to a new house, but when they stop on the way to explore an abandoned village, her parents undergo a mysterious transformation and Chihiro is whisked into a world of fantastic spirits ruled over by the sorceress, Yubaba. Put to work in a magical bathhouse for spirits and demons, Chihiro must use all her wits to survive in this strange new place, find a way to free her parents and return to the normal world. Overflowing with imaginative creatures and thrilling storytelling, Spirited Away became a worldwide smash hit, and is one of the most critically-acclaimed films of all time.

Blu-ray & DVD Combo Pack Bonus Features:

  • Feature-Length Storyboards
  • NTV Special (on DVD)
  • Original Theatrical Trailers
  • TV Spots
  • 12-page Booklet with Producer’s and Director’s Statements

Distributor: Shout! Factory

When Satsuki and her sister Mei move with their father to a new home in the countryside, they find country life is not as simple as it seems. They soon discover that the house and nearby woods are full of strange and delightful creatures, including a gigantic but gentle forest spirit called Totoro, who can only be seen by children. Totoro and his friends introduce the girls to a series of adventures, including a ride aboard the extraordinary Cat Bus, in this all-ages animated masterpiece from Academy Award®-winning director Hayao Miyazaki which features the voices of Tim Daly, Lea Salonga, and real-life sisters Dakota and Elle Fanning, in one of their earliest roles.

Blu-ray & DVD Combo Pack Bonus Features:

  • Feature-Length Storyboards
  • Original Theatrical Trailers
  • Behind the Microphone
  • Textless Opening and End Credits
  • Creating My Neighbor Totoro
  • Creating the Characters
  • The Totoro Experience
  • The Locations of My Neighbor Totoro
  • Producer’s Perspective: Creating Ghibli
  • 8-page Booklet with Producer’s and Director’s Statements

Distributor: Shout! Factory

Sophie, a quiet girl working in a hat shop, finds her life thrown into turmoil when she is literally swept off her feet by a handsome but mysterious wizard named Howl. The vain and vengeful Witch of the Waste, jealous of their friendship, puts a curse on Sophie and turns her into a 90-year-old woman. On a quest to break the spell, Sophie climbs aboard Howl’s magnificent moving castle and into a new life of wonder and adventure. But as the true power of Howl’s wizardry is revealed, Sophie finds herself fighting to protect them both from a dangerous war of sorcery that threatens their world. Featuring the voices of Jean Simmons, Christian Bale, Lauren Bacall, Blythe Danner, Emily Mortimer, Josh Hutcherson and Billy Crystal.

Blu-ray & DVD Combo Pack Bonus Features:

  • Feature-Length Storyboards
  • Original Theatrical Trailers
  • TV Spots
  • Interview with Diana Wynne Jones
  • Miyazaki’s Visit to Pixar
  • Explanation of CG
  • The Birth Story of the Film Soundtrack
  • Behind the Microphone
  • 8-page Booklet with Producer’s Statement and more

Distributor: Shout! Factory

When Sosuke, a young boy who lives on a clifftop overlooking the sea, rescues a stranded goldfish named Ponyo, he discovers more than he bargained for. Ponyo is a curious, energetic young creature who yearns to be human, but even as she causes chaos around the house, her father, a powerful sorcerer, schemes to return Ponyo to the sea. Loosely based on Hans Christian Andersen’s classic fairy tale The Little Mermaid, Miyazaki’s breathtaking, imaginative world is brought to life with an all-star cast, featuring the voices of Cate Blanchett, Noah Cyrus, Matt Damon, Tina Fey, Frankie Jonas, Cloris Leachman, Liam Neeson, Lily Tomlin, and Betty White.

Blu-ray & DVD Combo Pack Bonus Features:

  • Feature-Length Storyboards
  • Original Theatrical Trailers
  • TV Spots
  • The Five Geniuses Who Created Ponyo
  • Press Conference: Theme Song Announcement
  • Behind the Microphone
  • Opening Event at Hibiya Scala-Za Theatre
  • Interview with Hayao Miyazaki
  • Interview with Toshio Suzuki
  • Theme Song Music Video
  • Hayao Miyazaki Press Conference at the Foreign Correspondents’ Club of Japan
  • Creating Ponyo
  • Ponyo & Fujimoto
  • The Nursery
  • Scoring Miyazaki
  • Producer’s Perspective: Telling the Story
  • The Locations of Ponyo
  • 8-page Booklet with Producer’s and Director’s Statements and Lyrics

Distributor: Shout! Factory

It is tradition for all young witches to leave their families on the night of a full moon and fly off into the wide world to learn their craft. When that night comes for Kiki, she embarks on her new journey with her sarcastic black cat, Jiji, landing the next morning in a seaside village, where her unique skills make her an instant sensation. Don’t miss this delightfully imaginative and timeless story of a young girl finding her way in the world, featuring the voices of Kirsten Dunst, Janeane Garofalo, Phil Hartman, and Debbie Reynolds.

Blu-ray & DVD Combo Pack Bonus Features:

  • Feature-Length Storyboards
  • Original Theatrical Trailers
  • Ursula’s Painting
  • Creating Kiki’s Delivery Service
  • Producer’s Perspective: Collaborating with Miyazaki
  • Behind the Microphone
  • The Locations of Kiki’s Delivery Service
  • Kiki & Jiji
  • Flying with Kiki & Beyond
  • 8-page Booklet with Producer’s and Director’s Statement

Distributor: Shout! Factory

Inflicted with a deadly curse, the young warrior Ashitaka heads west in search of a cure. There, he stumbles into a bitter conflict between Lady Eboshi and the proud people of Iron Town, and the enigmatic Princess Mononoke, a young girl raised by wolves, who will stop at nothing to prevent the humans from destroying her home, and the forest spirits and animal gods who live there. Featuring the voices of Gillian Anderson, Billy Crudup, Claire Danes, Minnie Driver, Jada Pinkett Smith, and Billy Bob Thornton.

Blu-ray & DVD Combo Pack Bonus Features:

  • Feature-Length Storyboards
  • Original Theatrical Trailers
  • TV Spots
  • Princess Mononoke in USA
  • Behind the Microphone
  • 8-page Booklet with Producer’s and Director’s Statements

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J. Tonzelli is a writer, film critiquer, and avid Arnold/Van Damme/Bronson enthusiast who resides in rural South Jersey. He is the author of "The End of Summer: Thirteen Tales of Halloween" and the "Fright Friends Adventure" series, co-authored with Chris Evangelista. He loves abandoned buildings, the supernatural, and films by John Carpenter. You can read some of his short fiction at his website, JTonzelli.com, or objectify him by staring at his tweets: @jtonzelli. He apologizes for all the profanity.

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